Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Friday, October 11, 2019

Aging world population

In 2018, for the first time in history, those aged 65 or older outnumbered children younger than five globally. And the number of people aged 80 years or older is projected to triple, from 143 million in 2019 to 426 million in 2050

The population aged 65 and older is growing faster than all other age groups, especially as the global birth rate has been plummeting since the second half of the 20th Century. According to the World Health Organization, fertility rates in every region except Africa are near or below what's considered the 'replacement rate' – the level needed to keep a population stable. In most high-income countries this hovers around 2.1 children per woman.




Friday, August 9, 2019

China swine flu

August will mark one year since the outbreak of African swine fever — or swine flu — that has decimated the country's pig herd.

The pork industry is worth about $128 billion in China and the country's 375 million pigs make up just under half the planet's total.

The number of pigs China will fatten to prepare for slaughter and sale this year is predicted to fall by 20%, from 2018. This is the worst annual slump since the U.S. Department of Agriculture — interested in exports to China — began counting China's pigs in the mid-1970s.

The virus spreads easily among the animals as it can be carried in clothing, infected blood, or fluids from urine, saliva or faeces, and on tires and shoes.

There are concerns that Chinese provincial governments are suppressing data and asking pork companies not to report new outbreaks

The pig flu was first detected outside Africa in 1957, in Portugal, but never before has it spread so rapidly and been so damaging as it did in China now. All of the 33 provinces and regions in China have been affected.

Other countries are battling the outbreak. The disease has been found in Mongolia, Cambodia and North Korea. The UN Food and Agriculture Organization believes that cases reported by local governments are underestimates

This outbreak was first detected in China in August 2018 in Liaoning province in the northeast. The Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs immediately responded with emergency measures.

According to guidelines, all pigs in a three kilometer zone around an infected herd had to be killed. Roadblocks were meant to be set up and inspection and disinfection stations established within a 10-kilometer buffer zone. This was not strictly implemented.

Pork is the meat of choice in China and no meal is complete without it. Braised in sauce, as Mao Zedong demanded, in dumplings or just plainly fried or boiled, pork accounts for nearly three-quarters of Chinese meat consumption.

Pig rearing in China, despite large industrialized farms, remains a predominately small-scale affair. Pigs also provide cheap garbage disposal services.

https://www.theglobalist.com/china-agriculture-swine-flu-food-supply/

Wednesday, February 6, 2019

Are Negative Ions Good For You?

I have been critical of salt lamps that are touted to create negative ions which some people claim have health benefits.  There is a problem with this idea, which is that free ions aren't necessarily a good thing.  They are inherently reactive, like putting bleach into the air.  In the body these are called free radicals, which can cause cell damage.

This video does a really good job of looking at the health benefits of negative ions from a scientific perspective.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQ--scjcAZ4